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Biomes, Ecology, and Habitats Sites

 

Animal Bytes from the San Diego Zoo. Animals from all over the world are indexed geographically by continents, by order, and by habitats and ecosystems. Scroll over to the right on their menu bar and there's a whole big section on plants, including a list of all the species at the zoo!

 

ARKive "Explore 15,000 of the world’s endangered species. With over 100,000 photos and videos, discover what these animals, plants and fungi look like, what makes them special and why we should protect them." Fun stuff for kids! Games! Make an insect! Coral reefs! Food chains! Endangered species! Hibernation! Adaptation! Nocturnal! Penguin masks! Plants! Temperate rain forests! Quizzes! Adventure! Survival! Baby elephant videos! Habitats! Spawning salmon! Celebs! The Tripwire of Terror! Barn owls! China! Wrasse! Sharks out the yang!

 

Biomes from Enchanted Learning. Their usual fine site for elementary kids.

 

Biomes of the World - What's It Like Where You Live? From Missouri Botanical Garden. A great and renowned biome intro for kids.

 

Biomes of the World - from Marietta College of Ohio.  This one has lots of data in the form of tables, graphs, and great photos

 

Biomes Lessons with quizzes from Wahtonka High School.

 

Flag of Canada Bioweb "Canada's environmental destination for kids"  Organized into six sections: Wildlife, Climate Change, Energy, The North, Waste, and Land Use; then these are cross indexed under Games and Activities and Homework Help.  Under Climate Change/Games and Activities, we've done Chain Reaction (food chains) in the computer lab, under Climate Change/Homework Help we've done Tree Ring Analysis in the lab. Both kept kids engaged and learning. Recommended!

 

Ecosystems from NatureWorks is a good coverage of the subject for kids and teachers alike. Covers it all in one page, too.

 

Endangered species: games and how you can help. "Learn how loss of habitat and ecosystems can lead to a decline in biodiversity, and how the Endangered Species Act helps conserve endangered and threatened species."

 

Endangered Species and Conservation Biology Part of Kids Do Ecology, from UCSB.  Great information and links to other sites. From here, you can learn about condors, bald eagles, endangered sea birds, the Santa Cruz Island Fox, and even pygmy mammoths!

Environmental websites for kids from EarthEasy is a list if links to 24 websites from all over the world. Kids learn about all sorts of topics, many sites have activities, most have animated characters and/or contests, too.

 

 

 

Google Streets in the Deep The Instructify site wrote: "The good people at Google Street View have recently partnered with The Catlin Seaview Survey to provide underwater street views (italics ours) of several breathtaking reefs around the world. You can take your students on a fieldtrip to swim with sea turtles and manta rays without having to be scuba-certified. From identifying the variety of aquatic life forms depicted in and around the reefs to writing short stories set in the reefs; the possibilities for classroom use are as wide as the ocean and as deep as the sea. You can explore the complete collection here."

 

Great Plains Nature Center Website Index The Great Plains Nature Center in Wichita, Kansas is a wonderful place that lets all ages learn about the Great Plains' habitats: The prairie, woodlands, lakes, rivers, streams and wetlands, and the plants and animals who live there. Scroll down through their index. Make sure to look at the "INTERNET VERSIONS OF THE GPNC POCKET GUIDES". There are extensive! Guides for Raptors, Mammals, Snakes, Great Plains Shorebirds, (Where else could you find that?), Freshwater Mussels, Kansas Threatened and Endangered Species, Great Plains Waterbirds, and Wildflowers and Grasses. You will find information on every native animal, bird, fish, and plant in Kansas, most of which are native to all of the Great Plains of North America. Their Prairies of the World page is also worth a visit. So glad we found this site and are able to share it with you!

 

Habitats from the Office of Naval Research, USN, covers the habitats of the ocean. Yes, the oceans have habitats, too. Habitats covered are: Beaches, Coral Reefs, Estuaries, Hydrothermal Vents, Kelp Forests, and Sea Grass Beds. Each has these sections: Characteristics, Life, Humans & the Environment, and a Quick Quiz.

 

New SiteHow Wolves Change Rivers 4:33 long video narrated by George Monbiot describes how restoring wolves, a keystone predator in the Yellowstone Park ecosystem, caused a trophic cascade. The ecosystem balanced is restored and a cascade of effects causes major changes, even reshaping rivers! When he says "deer" he means "deer and elk (wapiti)" Yes and he sounds something like David Attenborough. Nat Geo had this to say: "The thing about this case study is that the same can be applied to apex predators around the world: lions in Africa, tigers in Asia. Sharks, bears, and wild dogs are all species sitting at the top of their respective food chains, creating stability amongst the species they prey on and maintaining the health of plants and animals right down the trophic ladder." Watch this video and be amazed!

 

Journey Into Amazonia from PBS. Excellent site that covers the Amazon basin.  Includes everything elementary and middle school would want to know.  The Amazon Explorer game is great.

 

Kids Do Ecology from UC Santa Barbara is a nice, kid-friendly intro to ecology. Well done site, be sure to explore it - and its links!

 

Ocean Collection for Kids This is a group of ocean sites for kids put together by faculty from Cal State LA. They cover ocean habitats, ocean mammals, and ocean fish. This is for elementary kids and has good simple explanations.

 

Plankton ChroniclesPlankton Chronicles "Plankton are any organisms that live in the water column and are incapable of swimming against a current. They provide a crucial source of food to many large aquatic organisms, such as fish and whales." (from Wikipedia) Watch videos and see photos of various sorts of plankton. There are 16 HD videos with more being added. Each narration explains the organism it's about. Very good quality videos with good sound, too. Click and explore the ocean and see different kinds of plankton emerge. This covers larval crustaceans, larval fish, cnidarians, ctenophores, diatoms, mollusks, tunicates, larval worms, various echinoderms, and more. All these can be plankton.

 

Project FLOW (Fisheries Learning on the Web) This is a series of three units about the Great Lakes of North America, from the University of Michigan: Food Web (Unit 1), Water (Unit 2), and Fish (Unit 3). The URL goes to Unit 1. Each unit has five lesson plans, and we mean BIG lesson plans. Everything teachers need to do each lesson is prepackaged and downloadable, even worksheets and graphics. We're talking Activity, Subject, Duration, Key Terms, Objectives, Material needed, Preparations, Procedure, etc. This was a huge effort and a lot of pdf files for the people who put this together.

 

Red List of Threatened Species "Life on Earth is disappearing fast and will continue to do so unless urgent action is taken. There are now 41,415 species on the IUCN Red List and 16,306 of them are threatened with extinction, up from 16,118 last year." Search the Red List for animals, birds, and plants here.

 

Santa Cruz Island FoxSanta Cruz Island Fox A study of the Santa Cruz Island Fox, this shows how the delicate web of ecology can be shredded, and how it can sometimes be repaired again.

 

 

 

Circle of topicsStream Biology and Ecology covers the biology, ecology & habitats, all the science of studying streams. Appealing format, too. Basics of Stream Ecology covers everything about a creek or stream! Stream Residents and Visitors (Biology) is shorter, but it has links to information about plants, animals, microscopic life, with lots of pictures (love the crawfish collection). How Biologists Study Streams (Science) covers terms, sample collection methods, collecting measurements, data identification and sorting, and an overview of analysis and reporting. Pretty cool. Thanks to the ladies who developed the idea and built the site!

 

Teach Ocean ScienceTeach Ocean Science Amazing, stupendous, colossal. This site features teacher resources (lesson plans) in three sections. (1) Ocean science curriculum "Teach an entire ocean science course or incorporate ocean concepts into your science classroom using this database of scientist and teacher-approved lesson plans." (2) Using the ocean to teach STEM has five interdisciplinary STEM activities ready to go as pdf files. (3) Modules - ten modules and a glossary covering various animal, vegetable, and mineral aspects of the sea. "Brush up on your ocean science content knowledge or find lesson plans to teach about the coastal ocean using these graphic interactive modules compiled by teams of scientists, teachers, and students."

 

Weird Fish Marine Reserve is a NatGeo video explaining the benefits of protected places in the ocean. Weird Fish Mel is your kinda offbeat guide. Part of NatGeo's huge Ocean section. We'll have a lot more from there!

 

 

 

Where do I live? from the BBC. Identify animals and place them in the correct habitat. Timed exercise, two levels of difficulty. Nice art and sound effects.

 

Wildlife Profiles and Information from Colorado Parks & Wildlife. Information of dozens of Colorado mammals and birds, native fish, reptiles, and some others. Useful for reports or just finding out. Each has its own page. While visiting the site, check out the Kid's Activities Page, especially the Black Bear Challenge and the (downloadable pdf file) Colorado Wildlife Coloring Book

 

Spinning Gold Star World Biomes  from Blue Planet Biomes is a concise but comprehensive site. Sparely written at an elementary level but does not talk down to kids. Colorful, too.

 

World Biomes from UC Berkeley is written at a more secondary level, but has good information and pictures.

End Biomes section                  

 

Spinning EarthEarth Day Sites

Earth Day 2013

 

 

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Education Center  Scary title, but this site has good information about global warming. Can be slow to load.

 

Earth Day from Kaboose.com.  Earth Day crafts, coloring pages, and activities.

 

Earth Day from Pocantico Hills School site. First graders Earth Day Book and activities. Pocantico Hills never ceases to amaze.

 

Earth Day from EcoKids. Printables and activities from this fine Canadian site, which is listed in our Science - Biomes & Ecology section.

 

Earth Day from Sheppard Software. Sheppard's great online Earth Day games include memory games, puzzles, word games, and painting. They all work, too!

 

Energy Kids featuring Energy Ant: learn all about where we get our energy and how we use it. Loaded with facts, games, and activities. The Glossary explains every energy term you ever heard of.

 

Energy Hogbusters: learn how to outsmart the hogs that waste energy.

 

EPA's Kids' Club: games and activities about environmental issues.  Very attractive home page. Oh, and a hundred or so links to other good, fact-filled environmental sites!

 

NIEHS' Kids' Pages Games, songs, riddles, stories, coloring, facts, plenty of links. A good place to go.

 

Nature Watch  US Forest Service site. Facts, resources, photo library, web cams, videos.

 

Roofus the Dog's Solar and Efficient Neighborhood: make your home energy smart. "My home is energy smart! Find out what makes it run!"   Fact-filled site, and we're always partial to dogs named Roofus wearing baseball caps.

 

S.K.Worm answers your questions about soil 'n' stuff! "It’s a dirty job but someone has to do it--S.K.Worm, the official annelid, or worm, of the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Natural Resources Conservation Service answers students questions about soil. Even their teachers can’t wiggle their way out of this one! Slither your way through these soiled questions and earn a very special diploma. You might even get hooked on Soil!"  Well, it is EARTH Day!

End Earth Day section      to top of page

Living Things Sites

 

This graphic teaches the difference between science and pseudoscience. It's important to understand the difference.

 

Herman the earthwormThe Adventures of Herman The autobiography of Squirmin' Herman the worm. Learn all about earthworms; their origin, taxonomy, anatomy, physiology, earthworm facts, what earthworms like to eat, growing your own worms, fun stuff (coloring, madlibs, jokes, etc.), and links. Basically anything K-12 students need to know about earthworms is in here. It's part of the large Just for Kids and Schools Online sites, part of the University of Illinois Urban Extension Urban Programs Resource Network.

 

Anatomy and Functional Areas of the Brain This graphic is very useful for anatomy and physiology classes.

Anatomy and Functional Areas of the BraIn

 

Animal Bytes from the San Diego Zoo. Animals from all over the world are indexed geographically by continents, by order, and by habitats and ecosystems. Scroll over to the right on their menu bar and there's a whole big section on plants, including a list of all the species at the zoo!

 

Animal Planet is a place that's loaded with animal information and games! Their Petsource section has guides to cats, dogs, and other pets, cat and dog breed info, dog horoscopes (Whaaa?), games, and more! The Wild Animals section has an A to Z listing of animals, bird guides, mammal guides, butterfly guides, an endangered species guide, and a lot more! The Games sections is stupendous fun for kids of all ages. All these things can be reached from the golden menu bar near the top of the screen. Thanks to Jessica the Opsmart lady for this one.

 

ARKive "Explore 15,000 of the world’s endangered species. With over 100,000 photos and videos, discover what these animals, plants and fungi look like, what makes them special and why we should protect them." Fun stuff for kids! Games! Make an insect! Coral reefs! Food chains! Endangered species! Hibernation! Adaptation! Nocturnal hijinks! Penguin masks! Plants! Temperate rain forests! Quizzes! Adventure! Survival! Baby elephant videos! Habitats! Spawning salmon! Celebs! The Tripwire of Terror! Barn owls! China! Wrasse! Sharks out the yang!

 

Biology, The Study of Life On Earth from KidsKnowIt is big with lots of explanations of terms.

 

Biology4Kids! is a fine welcome to biology for elementary and up. Good information and links. Worth checking out for lesson plans, as is its companion chemistry site below.

 

Biology Corner (updated review!) is a resource site for biology and other science teachers. It has lesson plans, web lessons, web quests, images, and quizzes. "The Biology Corner is a resource site for biology and science teachers. It contains a variety of lessons, quizzes, labs, web quests, and information on science topics. Biology is the study of life and living organisms, from the smallest bacteria to giant sequoias. Biologists use observation and experimentation to gain an understanding about the natural world." It's a gold mine for science teachers! Take a look at the first page and you'll be hooked!

 

Biology for Kids from Kidepedia Covers cells, viruses, bacteria, fungi, plants, and animals. Also activities, science projects, teacher's guide.

 

Biology Games from KidsKnowIt OK, where else will you find Biology Hangman?

 

Biology of Plants from Missouri Botanical Garden is a good elementary introduction to the subject.

 

Biomedia (commercial site) Check out the menu bar. Explore the BioGalleries and Teacher Resources sections. The BioGalleries have wonderful pages about all sorts of microscopic life, including plankton! (even water bears!) Includes a What Phyla Am I ? quiz with rollover answers. WONDERFUL PHOTOS!

 

CELLS Alive!  Wonderful teaching site for introductory cell biology and microbiology.  Used by elementary and secondary schools alike. Engaging visuals and interactive activities keep kids interested.

 

This graphic shows the stages of development of a chicken embryo. Clicking on it links to a great article with photos from The Poultry Site.

chicken embryo development

 

Classifying Animals (and plants, and all other living things). Find out how scientists have organized living things on the this page, and see an example (lions). From Fact Monster. Also see Taxonomy , for older students.

 

spinning gold starCyberchase "an online destination designed to captivate, entertain, and improve problem-solving and math skills is now bigger and better than ever!" The Games section has over 40 good applied math games. The Science section has activities plus an outstanding, ongoing series of Cyberchase Quest games.

 

DNA Interactive Amazing! Stupendous! Colossal! And other wow-type adjectives! This site for secondary and up students and teachers covers everything about DNA. Many videos, animations, and interactive games to play. There are 15 lesson plans ready for download, too. Really, this site could be used to help teach classes in genetics and human origins. Then there's the opportunity for educators to join the site community and create their own lessons and web pages for teaching the material. (The site's dedicated to Nobel winners Drs Crick and Watson and those who followed after. Well that's fine, but this link on GSFK is dedicated to Dr. Rosalind Franklin, who should have shared in the Nobel Prize, since she did most of the basic research that certain others, ahem, "borrowed".)

 

 

Dendrochronology from the NPS. This interactive presentation of tree ring dating is quite good. Like Tree Ring Analysis, this is a fine lesson on tree ring dating. Part of a larger site.

 

 

 

 

Developing Biology From Curriki. "This course contains resources for teaching high school biology, from Developing Curriculum, Inc. It includes activities, labs, slide shows and worksheets on the topics of: Microscopes; Biochemistry; Cells; Cellular Transport; DNA; Photosynthesis and Respiration; Mitosis and Meiosis; Genetics; and Evolution." Lots of PowerPoints and .doc files, but it's all good information. Good resources for a teacher who knows the subject but is in a hurry to get something together.

 

spinning gold starEEK! Environmental Education for Kids. This electronic magazine is for kids in grades 4-8. Surf around and learn more about the great outdoors. Every animal of any kind that lives in Wisconsin has a page in here somplace. The Creepy Critter Feature, Alien Invaders, Tracks Quiz for Beginners are all part of the wonderful Critter Corner, as is the Habitats section. Find out about woodland, lake, marsh, and prairie habitats and the animals that live there! Has a page for Teacher Resource section with lesson plans, too. From Wisconsin DNR.

 

EOL logoEncyclopedia of Life "Imagine an electronic page for each species of organism on Earth..." STUNNING new project from a group including the likes of Harvard University, the Field Museum, and the Smithsonian! Students and seekers of any age can type in the name of any living thing and (usually) see pictures and information! We had fun putting in names of plants, animals, and bacteria. Still a work in progress. Also has groups to join and ways you can help.

 

Evolution Teachers' Guide covers learning about evolution and teaching it. It's part of History of life on Earth - The Online Exhibits  from UC Berkeley, fabulous huge site about life on Earth. Using the scientific method to understand and teach evolution is well worth your time to read.

 

The Eyes Have It from the San Diego Natural History Museum. Facts about vision, eyes and eye anatomy, also covers animal vision.

 

fetal compaisonsFetal Devopment Comparison Chart. This chart compares fetal development in fish, turtle, chicken, pig, and human. It begins at the top with the eggs and ends at the bottom with the adults. The full size chart is going in Science and Nature > Living Things.

 

Credit: fofweb.com and Spring Valley HS in New York State

 

 

 

 

 

Five Kingdoms of Life for kids. Scientists group life into five "kingdoms" - (or six - or none - click here if you want to know more). Kids can learn about the kingdoms and what goes where at this site. From Fact Monster.

 

From DNA to You - Understanding Genetics This interactive Flash lesson simply explains Mendel's discovery of dominant and recessive traits, using Mendel's peas. For middle grades and up. This was featured in Curriki.

 

Gardening - Classroom Projects from Kids Gardening. Here are 26 gardening projects for school kids, with lesson layouts and notes. Nice for cross-curriculum springtime activities.

 

Gardening - Thematic Explorations Library from Kids Gardening. Here are 26 thematic units, most with Lessons & Activities and Resources sections. There is a lot of good resources and planning material in here.

 

 

 

Google Streets in the Deep The Instructify site wrote: "The good people at Google Street View have recently partnered with The Catlin Seaview Survey to provide underwater street views (italics ours) of several breathtaking reefs around the world. You can take your students on a fieldtrip to swim with sea turtles and manta rays without having to be scuba-certified. From identifying the variety of aquatic life forms depicted in and around the reefs to writing short stories set in the reefs; the possibilities for classroom use are as wide as the ocean and as deep as the sea. You can explore the complete collection here."

 

Great Plains Nature Center Website Index The Great Plains Nature Center in Wichita, Kansas is a wonderful place that lets all ages learn about the Great Plains' habitats: The prairie, woodlands, lakes, rivers, streams and wetlands, and the plants and animals who live there. Scroll down through their index. Make sure to look at the "INTERNET VERSIONS OF THE GPNC POCKET GUIDES". There are extensive! Guides for Raptors, Mammals, Snakes, Great Plains Shorebirds, (Where else could you find that?), Freshwater Mussels, Kansas Threatened and Endangered Species, Great Plains Waterbirds, and Wildflowers and Grasses. You will find information on every native animal, bird, fish, and plant in Kansas, most of which are native to all of the Great Plains of North America. Their Prairies of the World page is also worth a visit. So glad we found this site and are able to share it with you!

 

The Heart: An Online Exploration from The Franklin Institute. "Explore the heart. Discover the complexities of its development and structure. Follow the blood through the blood vessels. Wander through the weblike body systems. Learn how to have a healthy heart and how to monitor your heart's health. Look back at the history of heart science." Links to excellent explorations of all the above areas, with an exceptional section on blood. For upper elementary through high school.

 

model of blue whale heart

The heart of a Blue Whale is so big that people could fit inside!

 

Don't worry, this is just a full sized model of the real heart.

 

 

 

 

History of life on Earth - The Online Exhibits  from UC Berkeley.  The portal, the jumping off point for outstanding sources of biology education. From here one can go to:  History of Life Through Time "This enormous collection catalogs life on Earth, focusing on the ancestor/descendant relationships which connect all organisms, past and present."  Tour of geologic time "Journey through geologic time to see how the Earth has changed since its debut 4.5 billion years ago."  Understanding Evolution "...includes discussion of evolutionary theory, evidence for evolution, the relevance of evolution to our daily lives, and the history of evolutionary thought."  Paleontology Portal "The Paleontology Portal focuses on the fossil record of North America, including state-by-state U.S. paleontology, fossil photo galleries, and resources." K-12 education resources  "Activities and lessons specifically for K-12 teachers and their students." Also features The World's Biomes, and more.

 

Human Biology section of KidsKnowIt. Good and simple explanations.

 

Kids Guide to the Parts of A Flower is an educational offering from Avas Flowers, a commercial florist. This page does a good job of covering the names of the different parts and what they are for. A very strong point/gold mine is their list of links to 22* kid-friendly flower links, which offer plenty of awesome graphics, activities, and printable worksheets. * There are three more links but they're broken: # 3 Functions and Parts of a Plant (PDF), # 15 Kids Guide to Flower Pollination (PDF), and # 20 Plant Games and Quizzes.

 

If Organelles Could Talk...

If Organelles Could Talk - larger version

 

Infection Detection Protection from the American Museum of Natural History.  Meet the Microbes, Bacteria in the Cafeteria game, Infection ("The Game where YOU Are the Germ!"),  and How Lou Got the Flu. A fun way for kids to learn some disease vector basics.

 

Interactive Science Simulations from PhET/U of Colorado, Boulder! There are dozens of these great interactive simulations to download, embed, or play online! You can even contribute your own! Click on any one of these and a menu pops up with more info, including the option to sort by grade levels. Science teachers, you must see this site!

 

Invertebrate Notes is a good intro to the major invertebrate phyla (but no water bears!) with a lot of clear and readable information.

 

Kids' Habitat from the San Diego Natural History Museum.  Currently covers canines, eyes and vision, minerals, dinosaurs, bioluminescence, sharks, and Ms. Frizzle! Worth exploring. Thanks, Ginne.

 

Life from Windows to the Universe. "What is life? Does this sound like a strange question to you? Of course we all know what is meant by the word "life", but how would you define it? Explore the links at the right to learn more about the stuff life is made of, genetics, the diversity of living things, how they coexist in ecosystems and evolve over time."

 

Lights Alive! from the San Diego Natural History Museum.  Explore living creatures that light up! Facts and activities about animals with bioluminescence.

 

flag of IndiaMake Me Genius "India's Most Visited Place for School Science Videos" (In English) Right now they have 55 excellent, easy to understand elementary-age videos covering human biology, animals, earth science, electricity, rainbows, volcanos, weather, plants, health, teeth, states of matter, and more! Also free PowerPoints and Cool Facts trivia on many of these topics. Other parts of this site are available for a small subscription. It's a work in progress so more videos, etc will be added in the future. This is a student-made site, mostly. Thanks to the students at MMG for the email about their site!

 

Microbeworld covers everything microbial. Keeps you current with the latest microbe news; FAQs on microbes, viruses, bacteria, and prions; microbiology as a profession, resources for educators (a hotlist of links); and a great section called ASM Articles which today features 24 articles that make good teaching springboards.  Thanks, "Miss Sharon."

 

Microscopy-UK is an excellent British site. The Micropolitan Museum is your gateway to "the finest microscopic masterpieces nature has ever produced ." Sections on freshwater life, saltwater life, insects, and plants - all under the microscope. Also has videos. The Pond Life Identification Kit has valuable information.  Articles from their online magazine pop up all over Google. Examples are the water bear with its great video, and the visually stunning section on rotifers which begins here. This site makes heavy use of JAVA and avi videos.

 

Monterey Bay Aquarium's Kid's Corner and Teacher's Place Wow! Six live webcams, activities, games, lesson plans, printable teacher guides, learning activities, teaching units, songs with audio files, pdf files, video libraries. 168 pages of activities in the free, downloadable Sea Searcher's Handbook (PDF) alone!

 

NBII Kids "At NBII Kids, you'll find games, puzzles, stories, and projects that help kids learn about nature and conservation while having fun." Also downloadable coloring pages and more. This is the "kid" part of NBII, the National Biological Information Infrastructure - a massive array of biology databases set up to be a sort of relational database management system. Biologists have got to be loving this, fun for lay people as well.

 

Nature Adventures "Welcome to the home of the Emmy Nominated Television Series 'Nature Adventures With Terri And Todd', an educational and entertaining series created to showcase the beauty and wonder of the Midwest! Each season contains 13 fun, education-packed episodes. Terri Lawrenz and Todd Magnuson are your hosts!" They roam all over South Dakota and parts of adjacent states, checking out ecology and wildlife. The Online Learning section has all episodes from Seasons 1 and 2 are online as Flash videos! There are also resource links, video modules, photo galleries, and a glossary!

 

Neuroscience for Kids  "The smell of a flower - The memory of a walk in the park - The pain of stepping on a nail. These experiences are made possible by the 3 pounds of tissue in our heads...the BRAIN!! Neuroscience for Kids has been created for all students and teachers who would like to learn about the nervous system."  Looks like this site is for Middle School and up.

 

Ocean Collection for Kids This is a group of ocean sites for kids put together by faculty from Cal State LA. They cover ocean habitats, ocean mammals, and ocean fish. This is for elementary kids and has good simple explnations.

 

Ology from the American Museum of Natural History. We love this site! It covers "Ologies" such as Archaeology, Astronomy, Biodiversity, Earth, Einstein, Genetics, Marine Biology, Paleontology, and Water. The bottom half of the page has links to around 20 activities, experiments, and interviews. Then there's the Highlights section, Ask a Scientist, an Advanced section, and At the Museum. Click on the blue buttons in the At the Museum box. Only part of this great site is shown at a time. Be sure to use the Search box and enter a term like "horse" to find a ton of other information.

 

Origin of MRSA. Simply explained by this UC Berkeley site. How did S. aureus morph from a minor skin infection to a terror?

 

Plankton ChroniclesPlankton Chronicles "Plankton are any organisms that live in the water column and are incapable of swimming against a current. They provide a crucial source of food to many large aquatic organisms, such as fish and whales." (from Wikipedia) Watch videos and see photos of various sorts of plankton. There are 16 HD videos with more being added. Each narration explains the organism it's about. Very good quality videos with good sound, too. Click and explore the ocean and see different kinds of plankton emerge. This covers larval crustaceans, larval fish, cnidarians, ctenophores, diatoms, mollusks, tunicates, larval worms, various echinoderms, and more. All these can be plankton.

 

Plants for Kids Yet another amazing long list of links from Kathi Mitchell. Just about anything kids need to know about plants is in here. We're probably going to break this list down later.

 

Plants: From Seed To Flower This upper elementary and up site covers seed parts, monocots & dicots, plant reproduction, pollinations and pollinators, and growth cycles, and does it very well. It accesses other sites such as ThinkQuest and wraps it all into an organized package. Thanks to Elaine of khsteachers for the email suggesting this site.

 

Sci4Kids: stories about bugs. "Stories! Stories! Stories!" Tons of fun facts about "bugs!"

 

Sci4Kids: stories about plants.  "Stories! Stories! Stories!"  Tons of fun facts about plants!

 

Science News for Kids is for ages 10 and up because of its writing. Very interesting and NOT dumbed-down sections on: Atoms and Forces, Earth and Sky, Humans and Health, Life, Tech and Math, and Extra. Factual articles cover subjects in depth (examples: electronic Skin, Cars of the Future, Caecilians - the other amphibian, Anesthesia MRIs, the Little Ice Age, Seabird Math, No Frostbite for Dogs, Life Beyond Earth. Plenty of graphics to grab interest.

 

The Seed Site for Teachers and The Seed Site for Kids are parts of a larger site called (wait for it) The Seed Site. "A website devoted entirely to seeds!", a vast site from the UK with tons of information about seeds and thousands of photos. The teacher section has lots of overhead-friendly pix of flower parts, seed parts, dispersal, germination, kinds of plants, profiles of 200 plants, and info about using copyrighted images. The kid section has kid-friendly sections about starting out, planting, germination, seed saving, and a plant database. We thank the people at The Seed Site for their email!

 

Shedd Educational Adventures (SEA) from the Shedd Aquarium in Chicago. Lesson Plans, Interactives, and the Explorer's Guide! Interactives are the online learning games, indexed by grade level. We tried Build a Fish and it was fun!

 

DownloadZombie plague STEMware: Zombie Plague from the Partnership for Biotechnolgy and Genomics Education, University of California - Davis. " In STEMware: Zombie Plague, students explore a 3D world where they are responsible for identifying the pathogenic microorganism causing a deadly outbreak and implementing a cure... the science content embedded in the software deals with diagnosis, treatment strategies, and career connections that are applicable to any disease caused by viruses, bacteria or fungi. Interactions with characters in-game, introduce students to the variety of career pathways in modern biology along with diagnostic technologies used in the real world. Embedded assessments allow teachers to track student interactions." Download the game here, or use the Curriki link above. It's a 305mb .zip file, so we suggest you save the file on a flash drive for installs on more machines.

 

Taxonomy - the science of classifying. Site is at an upper elementary level. Shows kids the six kingdoms with examples, explains the classification structure from kingdom down to species, explains origins of genus and species names. From Granite City High School in Illinois. This is part of the Biology Corner resource site for science teachers.

 

Teaching Older Children and Youth About Trees from the Arbor Day Foundation. Online Games & Activities in the left column, Downloads & plans for Parents & Educators in the right column. Not the same as their Youth Education site, all their online games for older kids are in one place - here.

 

Timeline of Life's Evolution Wonderful interactive resource! A sliding time bar lets students go over 4.5 billion years in a few minutes. Click on the red button and pull it across from 4.5 to zero. Good reliable information and great graphics. The rest of the site, Understanding the RNA World and Building a Protocell, are for upper high school and college level.

 

Tree of Life from The Open University "Follow evolution and explore the variety of life on the planet with the Tree of Life." This interactive Flash file shows a simple tree of branches arrangement with typical examples of the organisms that belong there. It goes from primitive life at the bottom to the most complex life at the top. Students can zoom in and out to check out life forms and relationships. Each species has a description in a side window that appears when you click on its picture. The tree's branches may not be perfect, and there are things and relationships left out - perhaps in the interest of simplicity. Remember science ideas in general, and species origins and relationships in particular, are always changing as new things are found out. This is perfectly OK since the Scientific Method plays no favorites with ideas.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tree Ring Analysis  Part of Bioweb, excellent Canadian site listed in the Biomes section.  Like Dendrochronology, this is a fine lesson on tree ring dating.

 

 

 

 

 

Understanding Evolution "Your One-Stop Source for information on evolution." Evolution simply explained. This big group of web pages is subdivided into these areas: What is evolution and how does it work? How does evolution impact my life? What is the evidence for evolution? What is the history of evolutionary theory? From UC Berkeley.

 

Video Lessons about Cells "Grades 9-10 / Ages 14-16. This collection includes videos/presentations on the cell and different cell structures. This will include comparing different types of cells and the functions of the nucleus, mitochondria, cell membrane, ribosomes, vacuoles, endoplasmic reticulum, golgi body, lysosome, chloroplast, cytoplasm and cell wall." One of the 80+ STEM Curated Collections/Lesson Plans from Curriki!

 

DownloadThe Virtual Microscope from University of Illinois. Oh you've got to get this for kids! Amazing closeups! Plug in a digital projector and show these on the wall! "The Virtual Microscope is a NASA-funded project that provides simulated scientific instrumentation for students and researchers worldwide as part of NASA's Virtual Laboratory initiative. This site serves as home base for the Imaging Technology Group's contributions to that project—namely virtual microscopes and the multi-dimensional, high-resolution image datasets they view. Currently we provide 90 samples totaling over 62 gigapixels of image data. The Virtual Microscope, which is available for free download supports functionality from electron, light, and scanning probe microscopes, datasets for these instruments, training materials to learn more about microscopy, and other related tools. The project is open source and the code is available on Sourceforge." Note: This program requires Java. More info at the site.

 

Virtual Electron Microscope from the Discovery Channel is a sort of matching game. Given 10 slides, look at the images and description to sort them into the correct Name heading. Prety cool to use, good for grade school microbiology class.

 

Virtual Roach We love the things ya'll submit! This is from Orkin, the famous pest control people. Nicely done 3D roach dissection helps students learn insect anatomy! "The Virtual Roach is a web resource focused on insect anatomy that was developed as a technical reference and an instructional tool. The interface for the system links morphological terms with an extensive image archive, including scientific illustrations, scanning electron micrographs, and photomicrographs. Images are linked in a manner permitting a detailed examination and virtual dissection of the American Cockroach." Yes, and it was fun to play with, too! Includes lesson ideas. Thank you, Steve Clark of Orkin Pest Control.

 

Downloads WolfQuest Episode 2 is out! Download it! From the Minnesota Zoo and EduWeb comes this excellent download wolf simulation game. Players become a wolf and explore Yellowstone Park! Kids from elementary to high school love to play this game, it's hard to get them to stop! We printed out the enclosed instructions for players to use. Needs a newer computer with good graphics. The download includes both episode 1 and 2.

 

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Earth Science Sites (and Weather, too)

Atom Dust Planet

 

This graphic teaches the difference between science and pseudoscience. It's important to understand the difference.

 

A Matter of Degrees "Create your own temperature scale, then see how it compares to those of Fahrenheit and Celsius."

 

A Sense of Scale lets you use a sliding scale to move between the coldest and hottest temperatures in the universe. Present temperature is shown in Fahrenheit, Celsius, and Kelvin units. Interesting things about each stop are also displayed.

 

Atmospheric Optics covers rainbows and lots of other atmospheric phenomena. Astonishing photos and explanations with plenty of facts. "Light playing on water drops, dust or ice crystals in the atmosphere produces a host of visual spectacles - rainbows, halos, glories, coronas and many more. "Absolutely amazing.

 

Balancing Act from PhETBalancing Act from PhET is for elementary grades. It teaches Balance, Rotational Equilibrium, Lever Arm, Torque, and Proportional Reasoning with an easy to understand interactive applet using a teeter-totter. Kids think they're playing a game!

"Sample Learning Goals:
Predict how objects of various masses can be used to make a plank balance.
Predict how changing the positions of the masses on the plank will affect the motion of the plank.
Write rules to predict which way a plank will tilt when objects are placed on it.
Use your rules to solve puzzles about balancing.

The teacher's guide (pdf) contains tips created by the PhET team." It's good, like a recipe for doing this lesson. GSFK recommends you download it. PhET has LOTS of these simulations, indexed by grade level and by subject area.

 

Chem4Kids! is a good solid introduction to chemistry for elementary and up. Keeps kids' interest and full of facts.

 

Chembalancer and Element Quiz from FunBased Learning. "Welcome to Chembalancer and Element Quiz! These are little games that teach you about facts about elements and how to balance equations." Three decent drills on balacing equations plus a facts intro to element symbols, with auto re-testing when needed. These were fun and easy to play.

 

Chemistry for Grades 11-12 from Curriki. "This course contains resources, including slideshows, reviews, labs, worksheets, activities, quizzes, and diagnostics, for high school chemistry students. Units include Lab Setup and Safety; Nomenclature; Chemical Reactions and Balancing; Metric Systems & Conversions; Periodic Table and Trends; Atomic Structure; Nuclear Chemistry; Acids, Bases, & Salts; Bonding; Percent Composition; Solutions, Molarity, and Concentrations; Stoichiometry; Energy; Gas Laws; Reaction Rates and Equilibrium; Electron Configuration; and Redox Reactions." Starts with a diagnostic test (.doc file) to measure prior knowledge. The whole course is right there - no downloads, no pdf files, just click on the folder.

 

Chemistry from Curriki. This is a high school-level chem course from South Africa, for grades 10 - 12. Comes in PDF files organized in five folders. Covers most chem topics, as well as earth science, chemical industry, and gold mining (hey, it's South Africa.) Click the page's Information tab to learn more. Part of reviewer Comments: "This FHSST (Free High School Science Texts) Chemistry textbook contains a full course of material in the form of a 23-chapter textbook to be used in grades 10 through 12. The text can be freely modified and distributed, so long as no one attempts to limit its later distribution. The collection covers three main topics (Matter and Materials, Chemical Change, Chemical Systems) and then within those topics, they are broken down into G10, G11, and G12 chapters. The material is also available in folders organized by grade level. Each chapter is available for download as a .pdf document. Throughout each clear and comprehensive chapter are embedded activities, worked examples and exercises for exploration and assessment." Not aligned to US state standards but still very good.

 

Chemistry Vocabulary from high school chemistry teacher Mister Guch. A big page of high school chemistry vocabulary words with definitions. "If you're a college student or grad student looking for a vocabulary list with more involved terms on it, click HERE to see my Even Bigger Vocabulary List."

 

Australian flagContinents: A Student's Resource This great Australian page was suggested to us by a lady in Utah! Isn't the Internet great? Lists all continents, links to facts about all of them, list of all past supercontinents and their times, continental drift & tectonics, populations, other facts. also has history of continents, supercontinents of the future, much more. Links to a ton of information, all on one page! Thanks Liz Curtis, who suggested this link & said nice things about our Social Studies section!

 

Cool Zone for Kids from Utility Services of Alaska has a great site about water! The Story of Drinking Water, water FAQs, games, Water Cycle printables, how water is treated to make it potable, more.

 

Climate Science from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program. "...the goal of the Education and Outreach Program is to develop basic science awareness and increase critical thinking skills focusing on environmental science and climate change for K-12 students." All kinds of science-based kid activities are here.

 

spinning gold starCyberchase "an online destination designed to captivate, entertain, and improve problem-solving and math skills is now bigger and better than ever!" The Games section has over 40 good applied math games. The Science section has activities plus an outstanding, ongoing series of Cyberchase Quest games.

 

Netherlands flagCyberkidz "is an educational platform for boys and girls in the age of 4 till 12 years. By playing the educational games, children will practise subjects they learn in elementary school (PK-5)." The games are sorted by year from age 4 to 12, using a sliding bar. There are dozens of fun, playable games in every curriculum category, with new ones being added. This is an excellent site from the Netherlands.

 

Density Our quick & dirty explanation of this concept on one small branch page. Contains a great photo of liquids in layers, plus PhET's Density Simulation. A typical PhET offering. You can download them, too. Requires Java.

 

 

Dive and Discover This is student oceanography at its finest! Kids can check out a dozen ocean expeditions with plenty to find out at each one. The Deeper Discovery section has facts on everything from deep ocean currents to ice ages to plate tectonics. To top it off they have a good section for teachers with suggested lessons and more! Brought to you by the world-famous Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution.

 

Earth 100 Million Years From Now 3:19 video "Earth's landmasses were not always what they are today. Continents formed as Earth's crustal plates shifted and collided over long periods of time. This video shows how today's continents are thought to have evolved over the last 600 million years, and where they'll end up in the next 100 million years. Paleogeographic Views of Earth's History provided by Ron Blakey, Professor of Geology, Northern Arizona University."

 

Earth Science for Schools from Moorland School, Lancs., UK, has eight categories: Earth Origin, Structure, Plate Tectonics, Volcanoes & Earthquakes, Rock Cycle, Atmosphere, Fossil Fuels, and Polymers. The last two are middle school/high school level chemistry. These are all great and have lots of links (some of them don't work, though). A whole page on oil refineries with plenty of pictures. Plenty of animations, simple explantions, world-class high school level explantions of hydrocarbons, alkanes, alkenes, and polymers.

 

Earthquakes from the US Geological Survey. Track the latest earthquakes here, plus information about quakes and links to other sites.

 

Earthquakes for Kids from the U.S. Geological Survey (the USGS). Consists of 12 kid-friendly sections: Latest Quakes, Links & Activities, Puzzles & Games, Today in Earthquake History, Science Fair Project Ideas, Animations, How to become an earthquake scientists, Facts, Pictures, Ask a Geologist, the science of earthquakes, and a glossary.

 

New SiteEarthViewer "is a free iPad app that takes you through 4.5 billion years on Earth. EarthViewer allows you to select eons and eras to view. Within each eon and era you can view tectonic plates, continental drift, and other geological events. You can view major biological events in EarthViewer too. Climate data for the last one hundred years is available in the app. EarthViewer users can manipulate the virtual globe to see how each continent has moved and been altered over time." Credit = http://ipadapps4school.com/

 

Energy Kids featuring Energy Ant: learn all about where we get our energy and how we use it. Loaded with facts, games, and activities. The Glossary explains every energy term you ever heard of.

 

Engineering Interact is Interactive science & engineering for 9-11 year olds. Play the games to learn about the physics of light, sound, forces, electricity, and the Solar System. Good loud and flashy games that make kids think. From the Department of Engineering at the University of Cambridge, UK, serving your educational needs since 1209 AD. (Sorry, boffins din't say which College...)

 

September Equinox from timeanddate.com Great graphic, lots of information, links to sections about anything time and date related.

 

Exploring the Science of Light "This Web site is devoted to everything optics! You will find activities combining Jell-O and laser pointers, definitions of terms like acousto-optics and retroreflection, profiles of optics celebs who are changing our world and an optics timeline stretching from prehistory to the present. Don't forget to check out the tutorials featuring interactive applets and the sweet optical illusions!"

 

Four at Once: Volcano Quartet Erupts on Kamchatka "A unique show is taking place on Kamchatka these days: Four separate but nearby volcanoes are erupting simultaneously on the Russian peninsula. A Moscow film crew has produced an awe-inspiring 360-degree video of the natural fireworks." The link goes to the Speigel Online International start page. From there you can go to the slide show and the stunning 360 degree steerable video (Use your mouse to move the view around.)! View more photos and read the background story HERE. View 10 360° panoramas from the same page!

 

General Chemistry Online! A whole bunch of cool chem things, designed to help you survive Chem 101. Common compound library has stats on 800 different compounds! Notes, tutorials, glossary, flash library, toolbox, construction set, FAQs, simulations, and a Chemistry Exam Survival Guide! For high school and college chemistry, from Dr. Fred Senese, Professor of Chemistry at Frostburg state University, Maryland.

 

Geography4Kids! Yet another from the 4Kids! people. More Earth Science and Physical Geography than social science, that's why it's in the Science and Nature section.

 

Geography For Kids from KidsKnowIt. Nine sections explain elementary physical geography. This is an earth science geography site, not a political geography site.

 

Geology.com A site devoted to everything geological. The World Maps section alone is too cool for words. The US state map section has different kinds of maps for every state. Satellite maps of everything. A large geology dictionary. Superlative site!

 

Geology from Windows to the Universe. "Why do volcanoes erupt? How are rocks made? Why do rivers wiggle back and forth? What sorts of animals roamed the Earth long ago? These questions and many more can be answered if we know a little about GEOLOGY! That's the study of the Earth." Also covers plate tectonics. Has Beginner, Intermediate and Advanced levels so it's three sites in one. In Advanced, you get to find out what "ultramafic" means. Lots of information, well presented.

 

Geology For Kids from KidsKnowIt.  Elementary geology in five well laid out chapters, with games.

 

Grand Canyon Street View from Google. Explore the Grand Canyon, Colorado River, Phantom Ranch, and Meteor Crater! This wonderful grouping is FREE and you can look at these landmarks from anywhere! There's even music if you want it.

 

Gravity Wells This large, well done PNG image explains the idea of gravity wells in easy to understand cartoon form. It's from xkcd, a well know ubergeek site with cartoons of interest to, well, MIT/Caltech undergrads, shall we say. This one is probably appropriate for kids old enough to grasp the concepts it explains, but we cannot recommend you let your kids go to xkcd.

 

How Do Airplanes Fly? Here are some sites that help explain how airplanes fly. How Do Airplanes Fly? is from ConneCT Kids, the state of Connecticut's kid site. It covers The Four Forces (thrust, drag, lift, weight), and how propeller and jet engines generate thrust. Flight from Science Kids at Home explains how wings lift an airplane up, using pictures and simple explanation. Fun Flight Facts for Kids is part of the Science Facts section of the huge Science Kids site, from New Zealand. It discusses animals that fly, as well as aircraft, airships, and blimps. It simply explains Bernoulli's Principle, too. This one has lesson plans, too. How do Airplanes Fly? is a 1:33 video from WydeaWonders that uses graphics and narration to explain how wings lift aircraft.

 

How Low Can You Go? Use the "cascade" method to compress gasses to absolute zero! Keep trying.

 

Photo of hydrogen atom and its electron orbital/cloud

 

Interactive Science Simulations from PhET/U of Colorado, Boulder! There are dozens of these great interactive simulations to download, embed, or play online! You can even contribute your own! Click on any one of these and a menu pops up with more info, including the option to sort by grade levels. Science teachers, you must see this site!

 

Introductory Physics I from Curriki. Uses flash videos for the lesson and pdf files for questions. "Welcome to the NROC Introductory Physics course. This course is divided into two semesters and is designed to acquaint you with topics in classical and modern physics. The first semester discusses topics in Newtonian mechanics including: kinematics, laws of motion, work and energy, systems of particles, momentum, circular motion, oscillations, and gravitation. The first semester concludes with topics in fluid mechanics, thermal physics, and kinetic theory. The second semester discusses the topics of electricity and magnetism, waves and optics, and atomic and nuclear physics. The course emphasizes problem solving, and there are numerous interactive examples throughout. You will also gain laboratory experience through interactive lab simulations and wet labs."

 

Jmol: (FREE!) "an open-source Java viewer for chemical structures in 3D, with features for chemicals, crystals, materials and biomolecules. Jmol is an interactive web browser applet. Overview:

 

 

  • Jmol is a free, open source molecule viewer for students, educators, and researchers in chemistry and biochemistry.
  • It is cross-platform, running on Windows, Mac OS X, and Linux/Unix systems, and available in several languages.
  • The JmolApplet is a web browser applet that can be integrated into web pages.
  • The Jmol application is a standalone Java application that runs on the desktop.
  • The JmolViewer is a development tool kit that can be integrated into other Java applications.
  • Includes download instructions here
  • .
  • A handbook has been published for learning Jmol, and there are also other publications about Jmol.
  • There is also a list of tutorials designed to learn the use of Jmol, and more help, within Jmol Wiki.
  • Finally, there is a documentation section in this web site, for more technical details.
  •  

    Lightning Who else but WGBH would have a great nine minute video about lightning, with links and teacher help, too?

     

    Living Colour from The Australian Museum Online. This is a good explanation of colors and how we see them, with interactive activities online for kids.

     

    flag of IndiaMake Me Genius "India's Most Visited Place for School Science Videos" (In English) Right now they have 55 excellent, easy to understand elementary-age videos covering human biology, animals, earth science, electricity, rainbows, volcanos, weather, plants, health, teeth, states of matter, and more! Also free PowerPoints and Cool Facts trivia on many of these topics. Other parts of this site are available for a small subscription. It's a work in progress so more videos, etc will be added in the future. This is a student-made site, mostly. Thanks to the students at MMG for the email about their site!

     

    Marie Curie and the Science of Radioactivity This (online) exhibit brought to you by The Center for History of Physics, A Division of The American Institute of Physics. Everything you wanted to know about Maria "Manya" Sklodowska, Polish patriot and underground college student; and about Madam Dr. Marie Sklowdowska Curie, PhD: Pioneering research scientist. Inventor of a mobile X-ray lab in a truck for the French Army during World War 1, she then organized a fleet of these for battlefield surgeons. Discovered the elements polonium and radium. Wife, mother, and winner of two Nobel Prizes (and still a Polish patriot). There is a short version, for those who have a report to crank out (life tip: don't put off doing your assignments). There's a long version that covers everything and has links to other science bios. Both are very readable, and will leave you in awe of this lady. More links about her: Nobelprize.org discusses her her discoveries in radioactivity and chemistry and has her Nobel lectures. Some trivia: In 1935 Marie's daughter, Irène Joliot-Curie, was awarded the Chemistry Prize together with her husband Frédéric Joliot for the discovery of artificial radioactivity. Two generations of female Nobel Prize winners, which doesn't happen often. About.com has a short bio and a list of Curie links.

    XKCD - Zombie Marie Curie comic strip

     

    Lise MeitnerLise Meitner of Austria and Sweden

    Nuclear physicist, discovered nuclear fission, did all of the things Zombie Marie Curie said. Fled to Sweden ahead of the Nazis. Realized fission could be used to make atomic bombs - and the Nazis were close to figuring that out. Got word of this threat to the US government via Albert Einstein. Refused to go to America to work on the Manhattan Project. This little blurb about her does not pay proper tribute to Dr. Meitner or to her accomplishments. Check the link for more. Her bio is fascinating.

     

     

     

     

     

    Emmy NoetherEmmy Noether (1882 - 1935) was an awesomely brilliant German mathematician.

    Einstein called her a genius. Developed Noether’s Theorem, (Yes, THAT Noether) "an expression of the deep tie between the underlying geometry of the universe and the behavior of the mass and energy that call the universe home." Mostly she worked in abstract algebra; her theorem(s) were a sideline. It's hard to explain what she did if you don't have a strong background in calculus and physics. Find out more here and here. More about Noether's Theorem here. Emmy Noether fled to America ahead of the Nazis, in 1933. Sadly, she died of cancer two years later. :(

     

     

    Mineralpedia– A Mineral Photo Database and Identification Guide. An A to Z guide of hundreds of minerals, in color! Dakota Matrix Minerals is a commercial operation, so the minerals you see are mostly for sale. Therefore, they're displayed really well. The mineral galleries and search function are a big help. This site is constantly being updated with new arrivals from all over the world. This site may turn students into rock hounds :)

     

    Mineral Galleries is a commercial site with lots of mineral pictures and facts, arranged alphabetically and by type. (This is all on the left side of their site.)

     

    Mineral Matters from the San Diego Natural History Museum. Covers mineral properties, how to identify minerals, how to build a mineral collection, more.

     

    Molecularium We're showing off the Kids portion of the larger site, the Molecularium Project. This site teaches about molecules.  We really like the Nanolab (the big green button in the upper right corner.)  The Zoom in from space to the atomic level will grab kids' interest. Build lets kids assemble ever more complex molecules from Carbon, Oxygen, and Hydrogen.  Transform shows what happens when heat changes solid to liquid to gas. Thanks to Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute and the NSF for this site.

     

    Newton's Laws from The Physics Classroom For high school physics students and up (ages 15 and up). This is one part of a huge physics instructional site. There are quite a few pages and animations for each of the three laws. You navigate the site by clicking on the two horizontal guide bars near the top. The site gives students tutorials on the background principles, and is designed to explain it all in depth.

     

    Newton's Three Laws of Motion from Physics4Kids For (probably) ages 10 and up. All on one page. Simply written, with explanations for the "fancy" words.

     

    Oceanography from the Office of Naval Research, USN. Ocean in Motion covers characteristics of currents, tides, waves, and the Beaufort Wind Scale. Ocean Regions covers littoral, blue water, and the ocean floor, while Ocean Water looks at the properties of sea water (in depth :P) All the subsection topics have quizzes at the end, too! Then there's a short section on famous research vessels.

     

    Oil Refineries from Moorland School is getting its own page because kids need to know how we get gasoline (petrol), oil, asphalt, diesel, etc. Good easy explanation with a good diagram.

     

    Ology from the American Museum of Natural History. We love this site! It covers "Ologies" such as Archaeology, Astronomy, Biodiversity, Earth, Einstein, Genetics, Marine Biology, Paleontology, and Water. The bottom half of the page has links to around 20 activities, experiments, and interviews. Then there's the Highlights section, Ask a Scientist, an Advanced section, and At the Museum. Click on the blue buttons in the At the Museum box. Only part of this great site is shown at a time. Be sure to use the Search box and enter a term like "horse" to find a ton of other information.

     

    PhET Simulations - HTML5 PhET has six new simulations (more coming) that use HTML5 instead of Flash or Java. This means they are compatible with any modern browser, AND with tablets!* You don't have to download anything anymore. See the 2:26 video, it's worth watching. (*This is kind of a big deal.)

     

    Particle Adventure - The Fundamentals of Matter and Force. "An award-winning interactive tour of quarks, neutrinos, antimatter, extra dimensions, dark matter, accelerators, and particle detectors from the Particle Data Group of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory." Secondary school level site explains the Standard Model of fundamental particles and forces in a progressive modular layout with easy to understand graphics. Also includes information on particle accelerators and detectors, and the Large Hadron Collider. Excellent aid to understanding.

    Periodic Table Sites - Here are eight unique interactive sites.

     

    New Site

    Interactive Periodic Table from ABPI. "This module is in the form of a game and can help you understand patterns and trends within the Periodic Table. It can help increase your knowledge and understanding of the characteristics of each element." Players may choose which elements to work on, levels of difficulty, and time setting options. Beginners will want access to a periodic table for reference.

     

    Periodic Table of Elements from Corrosion Source. This site may not look "busy" at first glance, but it gives good information, lets you move around within the table in a unique way, and has sections for each element covering history, properties, sources, and uses. This is part of a large group of sites about the atomic elements. Related links can be found on the right side of the page.

     

    Periodic Table of Elements from dyah.com. Very colorful and informative! Click on an element and see its Wikipedia entry, or click another tab and learn about its properties, orbitals, and isotopes. Lots of information well arranged.

     

    Periodic Table of the Elements from Enchanted Learning. Your basic table but for somewhat younger kids. Explains how elements are arranged, explains atomic number, has different series color coded, and shows how many valence electrons the elements in each series have. Associated pages are The Chemical Elements (printable matching exercises and making element wheels as study aids), and the Table of Elements, a printable table with a 10 question quiz (answers available - for subscribers only). The $20 annual subscription to this huge site is worth the money.

    The Periodic Table of Videos from the University of Nottingham. Sure we have links to other quite good periodic table sites, but nothing like this! Each element has a video telling its history and usually a little demo of what it's good for. Very educational and sometimes quite funny! Do not fail to check out the dozens of Extra Videos, including some out takes! Personal favorites: (1) Coke Cans react with sodium hydroxide and with hydrochloric acid! (2) Buckyballs!

     

    New Site

    The Photographic Periodic Table of the Elements "There's a whole lot of stuff here, many thousands of pages of text, stories, pictures, and data. Most of it you get to by clicking on the individual elements on the front page, or using the navigation bar the top of nearly every page." Includes wonderful photos of the elements in their natural state, "Hundreds of descriptions of the objects. Complete technical data about every element. Complete information about radioactive decay chains."

     

    Proton Don from FunBrain is an elementary game for learning the Periodic Table. The games teaches the elements' names and their symbols. Different levels and challenges scale and scaffold the process. It's for younger students, so there's nothing about atomic numbers or atomic weights, or groups, metals, etc.

     

    Setting the Periodic Table from the Science section of Mr. Nussbaum.com - "A Thousand Sites in One." Scroll over the various elements to learn more about them, or play the game to see if you can find them on the chart. We are so glad Mr. Nussbaum sent us that email about his site, because it is world-class!

     

    New SiteVisual Elements Periodic Table "The Royal Society of Chemistry's interactive periodic table features history, alchemy, podcasts, videos, and data trends across the periodic table. Click the tabs at the top to explore each section. Use the buttons above to change your view of the periodic table and view Murray Robertson’s stunning Visual Elements artwork. Click each element to read detailed information." Neat things about this site: A sliding scale shows the state of each element (solid/liquid/gas) a temperatures from 0 Kelvin to 6,000 Kelvin; a History sections uses the sliding scale to show when each element was discovered; an Alchemy section shows alchemists' symbols for the 16 elements they knew; there are also podcasts and videos for each element; and a Trends sections that shows periodic tables for Density, Atomic Radius, and Electronegativity!

    WebElements The Periodic Table on the Web. From the UK via the University of Sheffield comes this interactive site. Choose an element from the periodic table. Click on the speaker and hear about the element you've selected, or just read the information. Includes description, essential data, uses, history, compounds, etc. Click Find a Property to find out about relative abundance on Earth and elsewhere, valence, orbitals, an long string of other facts. The You Are Here helper at the top of the page keeps students from getting lost. If you need a fact about any element, it's in here. Oh, did we mention the interactive graphs on the first page?

     

    End Periodic Table site listing. to top of page


    Physical Constants for Fire Investigators. This a forensics site from Australia. It's valuable to teachers and students who need to know: flame colors, melting points and ignition temperatures of different plastics, metals (melting points), liquids (boiling points, flash points, ignition temperature, and heat of combustion in kcals/gram), gases (flammable limits, ignition temperature). Special sections for steel, concrete, glass, and house insulation. Good for physics and chemistry, among other things. BTW all temps are in Celsius.

     

    Physics from Windows to the Universe. "Physics is the study of basic properties, materials, and forces in our Universe. Our new physics section will start off with some background material about space, time, and matter. It will also include sections on mechanics, electricity and magnetism, thermal physics, atomic physics and particle physics, and tools for math and science (vectors, coordinate systems, units of measurement, etc.)." Has Beginner, Intermediate and Advanced levels so it's three sites in one. Lots of information, well presented.

     

    Physics 4 Kids! offers good basic information on physics principles. Well organized and well worth checking out.

     

    Rock Cycle is a full screen pdf graphic from the Utah Geologic Survey. (check out the whole site or buy posters at this link) Utah has a LOT of geology to be proud of. This pdf graphic of the rock cycle is simplified for kids, but it shows all the important data. Nice graphic!

     

    Rocks for Kids An introduction to rocks and minerals for elementary and middle school levels.

     

    Savage Earth from PBS covers Earth's crust, volcanoes, earthquakes, and tsunamis. Good writing with plenty of Flash animation.

     

    New SiteOpening screen of The Scale of the Universe 2The Scale of the Universe 2 From PolicyMic: "Most of us have trouble visualizing the height of buildings, or the distance it takes to get home from work, let alone things on an intergalactic scale. The interactive graphic made by 14-year-old Cary Huang may be the best tool to help us understand our place in our vast universe. The interactive piece allows the viewer to zoom through scale and space, from quarks to galactic clusters. The real genius of the interface is the ability to scroll back to a familiar object like a car — the time spent scrolling helps to convey a sense of size and distance." You can find out more about objects displayed by clicking on them. You can find out more about the Huang brothers here.

     

     

    Science for Kids from Kidepedia Covers Physics, Chemistry, and Geology. The site does a decent job of explaining.

     

    Flag of New ZealandScience Kids Fun - Science and Technology for Kids! This immense site has dozens of videos, hundreds of facts, 30 sections of science topics, elementary school experiments, lesson ideas, lesson plans, games, quizzes, projects, and a huge picture library! From New Zealand, which has a lot of "good sites."

     

    Science: It's A Girl Thing | Facebook "Welcome to the official Facebook Page of Science: It's A Girl Thing. Get exclusive content and interact with Science: It's A Girl Thing right from Facebook....We currently have 10 downloadable pdfs of activities, templates for keeping a science notebook, and a downloadable sheet of tips for parents for doing short science activities around the house. We also have an active community of nearly 3,000 users."

     

    Science News for Kids is for ages 10 and up because of its writing. Very interesting and NOT dumbed-down sections on: Atoms and Forces, Earth and Sky, Humans and Health, Life, Tech and Math, and Extra. Factual articles cover subjects in depth (examples: electronic Skin, Cars of the Future, Caecilians - the other amphibian, Anesthesia MRIs, the Little Ice Age, Seabird Math, No Frostbite for Dogs, Life Beyond Earth. Plenty of graphics to grab interest.

     

    Seafloor Spreading with Bill Nye. "A video clip featuring the discovery of seafloor spreading and its contribution to the development of the Plate Tectonics Theory. Hosted by Bill Nye." How a geologist named Harry Hess discovered the seafloor was spreading and led to the theory of plate tectonics!

     

    Fact Monster's Solstice for Kids Explains the solstice concept, the changing angle of the earth, and solstice history and traditions.

     

    Sarychev volcanoThe 2009 eruption of the Sarychev volcano, as seen from space.

    Sarychev volcano 2009 You Tube Click the logo to watch it on You Tube

    Find out more about Sarychev at Volcano Discovery

    See Sarychev's location on Google Earth.

     

     

     

    States of Matter "Adjust temperature and pressure, and watch as gases become liquids, liquids harden into solids, and more."

     

    DownloadBalloons and Static Electricity Another interactive science simulation from PhET. "Why does a balloon stick to your sweater? Rub a balloon on a sweater, then let go of the balloon and it flies over and sticks to the sweater. View the charges in the sweater, balloons, and the wall."

     

    Strange Matter uses Flash animations to explore Materials Science. "Experience the structure of materials in Zoom. Encounter the properties of various materials in Materials Smackdown. Enjoy processing materials to create something new in The Transformer. Explore the performance of various materials in The Change the World Challenge." Includes Stuff For Teachers and Stuff For Families.

     

    String Wave Simulation   A Flash file from the Physics Dep't, University of Colorado. Play with the oscillations and learn about wave amplitude, frequency, and more!  Fun for all, most educational for Middle School and up.

     

    Teach Ocean ScienceTeach Ocean Science Amazing, stupendous, colossal. This site features teacher resources (lesson plans) in three sections. (1) Ocean science curriculum "Teach an entire ocean science course or incorporate ocean concepts into your science classroom using this database of scientist and teacher-approved lesson plans." (2) Using the ocean to teach STEM has five interdisciplinary STEM activities ready to go as pdf files. (3) Modules - ten modules and a glossary covering various animal, vegetable, and mineral aspects of the sea. "Brush up on your ocean science content knowledge or find lesson plans to teach about the coastal ocean using these graphic interactive modules compiled by teams of scientists, teachers, and students."

     

    Utah's Dinosaur Record from the Utah Geologic Survey. (check out the whole site or buy posters at this link) Utah has a LOT of dinosaurs to be proud of. This pdf graphic of Utah's dinosaur history shows the eras/ages that make up the Mesozoic Era, and aligns them with local formations. From the Upper ("late") Triassic to the end of the Cretaceous, all known Utah dinos and their artifacts are listed by their place in time. Great for education, since it gives a sense of scale as to how long the dinosaurs were around!* This is an excellent graphic!

    *You could take elementary kids out on a football field and have them step it off, too.

     

    New Site

    Vesuvius - Pliny the Younger's letters to the historian Tacitus about the eruption and the death of his uncle, Pliny the Elder, and a second letter about his own escape and what it looked and felt like to be in the volcanic cloud. Pliny the Elder was a senior naval officer who led a squadron of ships to rescue the people of Pompeii. Amazing nearly 2,000 year old letters, great Primary Source for history. Probably best for 5th grade and up, or a literate 4th grader.

     

     

    DownloadThe Virtual Microscope from University of Illinois. Oh you've got to get this for kids! Amazing closeups! Plug in a digital projector and show these on the wall! "The Virtual Microscope is a NASA-funded project that provides simulated scientific instrumentation for students and researchers worldwide as part of NASA's Virtual Laboratory initiative. This site serves as home base for the Imaging Technology Group's contributions to that project—namely virtual microscopes and the multi-dimensional, high-resolution image datasets they view. Currently we provide 90 samples totaling over 62 gigapixels of image data. The Virtual Microscope, which is available for free download supports functionality from electron, light, and scanning probe microscopes, datasets for these instruments, training materials to learn more about microscopy, and other related tools. The project is open source and the code is available on Sourceforge." More info at the site. Note: This program requires Java.

     

    Volcano Online game from Natural History Museum.  "Build a volcano, let it erupt, then build another."

     

    Volcano World (new URL!) is a great, kid friendly site. Kid's volcano art, games, virtual field trips, stories, and more serious things like Current Activity. Thanks, Oregon State University.

     

    The Water Cycle in an easy to understand graphic!

    Water Cycle .pdf printable booklet for kids

    Diagram of the water cycle

     

    What on Earth is Plate Tectonics? from the US Geological Survey (USGS). This unassuming site is in reality the jumping off point for everything you might ever need to know about the subject. There's a beginner's introduction that explains all the terms, followed by a link to This Dynamic Earth: The Story of Plate Tectonics - an online book that burrows (so to speak) into the subject. There are side links to explain topics for you, and plenty of amazing graphics, maps, pdf files, and a cool sub-site, Plate tectonics animations, with all sorts of animated graphics!

     

    World Geography Games "Welcome! Can you point out Sudan on the map? How about the Strait of Hormuz? This website will bring you many entertaining and stimulating map games to improve your geographical knowledge. The quizzes include questions about countries, regions, bodies of water, mountains, deserts, metropolitan areas and other topics that will test and challenge your brain. For everyone who wants to explore and learn about the world, you've come to the right place!" Twenty-two very colorful, very accurate, interactive modules. These are all either "click on" _____ or "drag the correct label to" _____ exercises, perfect to learn geographic facts. Modules are forgiving and will help students learn. Available in English, Dutch, German, French, and Spanish. PS: There's a similar game of Europe only facts, too - Geography Games Europe. GSFK wants to thank Sonja Snoek and her company, EastDock Media, in Amsterdam, Netherlands.

     

     

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    Kilroy was here

    Weather Sites

    Climate Science from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program. "...the goal of the Education and Outreach Program is to develop basic science awareness and increase critical thinking skills focusing on environmental science and climate change for K-12 students." All kinds of science-based kid activities are here.

     

    Dew Point Calculator "Use this calculator to explore various combinations of temperature, RH, and dew point..." What's dew point? "The dew point temperature is the temperature at which the air can no longer 'hold' all of the water vapor which is mixed with it, and some of the water vapor must condense into liquid water." (from Weather Questions.com)

     

    Earth Wind Map Quoting Daily Kos: " ... a new graphical development called the Earth Wind Map has set a new standard for combining fascinating imagery with (near) real-time wind information. Check it out and we think you'll agree that the 'wow' factor is off the chart...

    ...the interactive map allows users to monitor wind patterns virtually anywhere on earth. The Google Earth-style display lets you adjust the globe's image to pinpoint any spot on the planet. Data is updated every three hours.

    While flow patterns indicate wind direction — almost hypnotically — all over the planet, a subtle color scheme indicates wind strength, with gentle breezes represented by thin green lines, stronger winds by bright yellow, and extreme winds by red."

     


    Hailstones and hailstorms

     

    Here's a Wikipedia photo of a hail shaft! It's the white column coming down from the storm cell. Get caught under one of these and there'll be hail to pay!

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Here's a Wikipedia photo of storm clouds showing the infamous greenish color that means there is hail inside.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    World Record Hailstone

    Click the link for a bigger photo of this world record hailstone.

     

     

     

     

    How Does Hail Form? Scientist explains how on this YouTube video.

     

    Examine an animation of hail forming. From ClassZone.

     

    Hail stones photo from Science Kids, a New Zealand site that's world class.

     

    Giant Hail Breaking Windshield (June 10, 2010 Last Chance, Colorado) is the title of this YouTube video. Four minutes of guys driving while hailstones smash their car! For sure this will bring home what it's like to be in an extreme hail storm. Yes there really is (or was) a Last Chance, Colorado.

     

    Here are two graphics and another photo:

    Cross section of hail cloud

     

    Another simplers cross section of a hail cloud

     

    Big hailstones from South Dakota 2013 These are also from South Dakota, along the edge of the Black Hills. These were large enough to dent cars, break windows, and rip leaves from trees. These stones had concentric white layers with light blue centers.

     

    Remember, if you see a big, very dark cloud with green sections in it, take cover.

     

    We hope you've enjoyed getting "hail-smart"!

     


     

    Hurricanes, Typhoons & Cyclones All about these extreme storms. Animated guides explain hurricanes, typhoons, and tornadoes, with lots more information to read.

     

    Lightning Who else but WGBH in Boston would have a great nine minute video about lightning, with links and teacher help, too?

     

    NOAA Tracks storms, hurricanes, typhoons, earthquakes - a huge site with many links. Track hurricanes by clicking on the NOAA Storm Tracker on the left of the page. The Storm Tracker has a popup with various maps and data.

     

    National Hurricane Center from NOAA. Track hurricanes, typhoons, and tropical cyclones worldwide with links from this page. The start page shows Atlantic tropical storms and hurricanes.

     

    National Weather Service Enhanced Radar Image Loop National Mosaic Watch thunderstorms, blizzards, and other weather move across America in nearly real time! Click on any area that interests you to see a closer look at local weather.

     

    Riding the Winds with Kalani - A Weather Adventure Weather for Primary Grades. This very colorful set of pages from U of I's Urban Extension covers the sun, seasons, temperature, types of clouds, and types of precipitation. Colorful, animated, and narrated, the site makes it easy for younger students to "get" these concepts.

     

    Science News for Kids is for ages 10 and up because of its writing. Very interesting and NOT dumbed-down sections on: Atoms and Forces, Earth and Sky, Humans and Health, Life, Tech and Math, and Extra. Factual articles cover subjects in depth (examples: Electronic Skin, Cars of the Future, Caecilians - the other amphibian, Anesthesia MRIs, the Little Ice Age, Seabird Math, No Frostbite for Dogs, Life Beyond Earth. Plenty of graphics to grab interest.

     

    New Site

    Skypunch (hole in clouds)Skypunch More properly called a "fallstreak hole"

    This is only a natural meteorological phenomenon. This happens all over the world.

    Ice crystals form above the high-altitude cirro-cumulo-stratus clouds, then fall downward, punching a hole in the cloud cover.

    When some people see these, they think it's the end of the world. They have thinking that since prehistoric times.

    It is not a secret government conspiracy. It's just that some "uninformed" people are easy to entertain.

     

     

     

    Supercells are the most severe classification of thunderstorms. Even though it is the rarest of storm types, the supercell is the most dangerous because of the extreme weather generated.

    Colorado Supercell

    Credits: Science Is Awesome on FB/ Top photo: Ryan Shepard, Greeley, CO, or check him out on Facebook logo

    Lower photo: Jeremy Holmes Photography It's NOT a painting, it's a photo!

    Nebraska Supercell

     

    Supercell Storm

    Credit: University of Illinois

     

    Wikipedia has an excellent description & beautiful, scary graphics.

     

    “A beast”: Shocking, enlightening supercell thunderstorm photos from Nebraska. These are pretty much definitive!

     

     

    A Supercell Thunderstorm Over Texas This is the famous Mike Olbinski video! It is scary. Also a great and valuable video record of one of these things in action.

     

    Here's a Mike Oblinski photo of an eerie green and purple storm with mammatus clouds.

     

    New SiteJaw-dropping Photographs Capture the Sublime Power of Superstorms These photographs say it all (and have descriptions). If you live somewhere these monsters never pass through, be glad. From Robert T. Gonzalez on IO9.

     

    The Weather Channel Kids! Local forecasts, weather for trips, on your desktop, a Dictionary, a Glossary, a resource guide, teacher resources, weather games (in progress), more.

     

    Web Weather for Kids  Old and respected kids weather site covers clouds, blizzards, hurricanes, tornadoes, thunderstorms with games, activities, lots of good information and many links to more "stuff."

     

    Weather Questions This page answers your weather questions! It's in alphabetical order, and answers everything from "What are Aerosols?" to "What is Wind Shear?" Easy to read and accurate answers.

     

    Weather Wiz Kids  A site from a working television meteorologist. "I designed this website especially for kids to allow them to learn more about the fascinating world of weather. It’s also a wonderful educational website for teachers and parents that gives them the right tools they need to explain the different types of weather to children. " Huge menu on the left side of the home page has tons of weather and geology-related links.

     

    Wind Chill Calculator from NWS. Enter a temperaure in Celsius or Fahrenheit. Enter the wind speed in miles per hour, kilometers per hour, knots, or meters per second. Click Convert, and you're done. Results are given in Fahrenheit, Celsius, and Watts per meter squared. The site also has the formula used to do the conversion, with tips on what to change to get more exotic results.

     

    wind maps gallerywind map "An invisible, ancient source of energy surrounds us—energy that powered the first explorations of the world, and that may be a key to the future. This map shows you the delicate tracery of wind flowing over the US." Fantastic art accurately reflects current winds!

     

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    Combined Sciences

    Sites with both Earth & Life Science sections

    All Science Fair Projects Here's a site that has searched for and categorized all kinds of science fair project links, and offers it to you free! 10 different topic sections, subcategories, lots of projects under each heading. Look for ideas here!

     

    Athropolis  Facts and stories about the Arctic in a very colorful format!  The Arctic Library has hundreds of facts about the Arctic. ICEBERG is a kid text adventure set on an iceberg with people living on it who don't get along. Plenty more on this site, too.

     

    BBC Schools Science Ages 4-11.  Useful anywhere, even at home. Coordinated with British elementary curriculum.  We've been using Science Clips the most but it is all great.  There are literally dozens of activities covering elementary physics, health, life science, nutrition, food chains, biology, chemistry, and links to the very good BBC maths and literacy sites.

     

    BrainCake Welcome to the Girls' Math & Science Partnership, a program of Carnegie Science Center. Based in Pittsburgh, "BrainCake is an online sisterhood for girls 11 – 17 and stakeholders focused on girls’ inclusion in the areas of math, science, technology, and engineering. BrainCake.org features forums, programs, scholarships, virtual mentoring, girl blogs, podcasts, homework help, research and resources in a framework that integrates pop culture, science, and learning."

     

    BrainPOP - Health, Science, Technology Educational Site Very well done subscription site with reading and animations, covering a good part of the K-8 curriculum, such as cell structure and function, microorganisms, plants, vertebrates, invertebrates, organ systems, and the Scientific Method. Uses Flash extensively.

     

    Cool Cosmos Amazing site - Ask an Astronomer videos, games, infared animals and tours, just a ton of amazing graphics. Use the up and down arrow buttons on the left of the screen to select different areas. (Infared Zoo is our fave!)

     

    Cool Zone for Kids from Utility Services of Alaska has a great site about water! The Story of Drinking Water, water FAQs, games, Water Cycle printables, how water is treated to make it potable, more.

     

    Deep Sea Images has thousands of undersea photos. Coral, sharks, wrecks, turtles, crabs, squid, anything you can think of, they probably have a photo of it!

     

    Dive and Discover This is student oceanography at its finest! Kids can check out a dozen ocean expedition with plenty to find out at each one. The Deeper Discovery section has facts on everything from deep ocean currents to ice ages to plate tectonics. To top it off they have a good section for teachers with suggested lessons and more! Brought to you by the world-famous Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution.

     

    Experiland "Welcome to our lab, fellow scientist! CAUTION: This website might be addictive! Fun Science projects for kids!Great care has been put into our science projects to provide the young student of today with the basic knowledge of the scientific principles of our world. Try not to have fun - We dare you!" LOTS of science experiments & projects, indexed by grade or by subject. Chemistry, earth science, weather, life science, electricity & magnetism, and physics!

     

    Exploratorium "The museum of science, art and human perception." A real museum in San Francisco with a Great! Big! Cool! Site! Family friendly online activities and pages that cover most everything in the curriculum. Something for everybody. Teachers can find some good ideas here. Look around carefully and find hidden treasures like the Institute for Inquiry.

     

    Extreme Science “Here you'll find world records in natural science, including earth science and the plant and animal kingdom. Not only will you find out who holds the records, but also key science concepts used to explain the story behind the record." Covers the Animal Kingdom, Earth Science, Space Science, and Technology. Dozens of areas are covered. Look past the hoopla, it's really a pretty good site!

     

    From Sea to Shining Sea  Awesome oceanography site!  Explore 19 American underwater wonders from the Marianas Trench to the Puerto Rico Trench.  Some coastal, others are deep sea. Explore by theme or by region. Many links to other sites for even more information.

     

    Fun 'n' games from the Natural History Museum.  Be a dinosaur, collect specimens, be a detective, build a volcano, be a head lice racer (Wait, what?)

    I Was Wondering.org Introducing women's adventures in science! Bios and timeline of 25 women scientists who have made this a better world. Ten of them their own pages on this site! There are games and an Ask It section for your questions. Girls can too do science! Thanks, Terri.

     

    JASON Project National Geographic's Jason Project - Education through Exploration.  "Have you ever imagined flying directly into a hurricane? Or submerging into the darkest depths of Earth's oceans? Have you ever wanted to join a real science mission, or create your own video for a global online science fair? Welcome to The JASON Project, your gateway to adventure."

     

    Journey Into Amazonia from PBS. Excellent site that covers the Amazon basin.  Includes everything elementary and middle school would want to know.  The Amazon Explorer game is great.

     

    Kids' Habitat from the San Diego Natural History Museum.  Covers canines, eyes and vision, minerals, dinosaurs, bioluminescence, sharks, and Ms. Frizzle! Worth exploring. Thanks, Ginne.

     

    "Kids' Science Challenge is a nationwide competition for 3rd to 6th graders to submit experiments and problems for REAL scientists and engineers to solve. Play science games, watch videos, and enter to win awesome prizes and trips! The site includes downloadable science projects, fun videos, educational games, and lesson plans for classroom or after-school use that are aligned to National Science Education Standards." We believe this is an excellent way to advance science education.

     

    flag of IndiaMake Me Genius "India's Most Visited Place for School Science Videos" (In English) Right now they have 55 excellent, easy to understand elementary-age videos covering human biology, animals, earth science, electricity, rainbows, volcanos, weather, plants, health, teeth, states of matter, and more! Also free PowerPoints and Cool Facts trivia on many of these topics. Other parts of this site are available for a small subscription. It's a work in progress so more videos, etc will be added in the future. This is a student-made site, mostly. Thanks to the students at MMG for the email about their site!

     

    Middle School Science is a good site with lesson plans and links to other science sites for middle schoolers. Covers chemistry, physics, earth science, and life science. Has a Lesson of the Week section and more.

     

    NOAA's National Marine Sanctuaries Educational Activities is a collection of wonderful fun things for kids and classes to do. The virtual dive into the kelp forest treats it like a rain forest!  Tour a real shipwreck, learn about sea otters and harbor seals, check out elephant seals, learn a LOT of cool facts about coral and reefs, it's all here. Fun, real oceanography!

     

    Natural History Museum Located in London, UK, the Natural History Museum has a fine web site for teachers and kids. If you cannot go there in person, the site is the next best thing.

     

    Nature Online is a section of the Natural History Museum site.  Covering everything from Jamaican plants to biodiversity to global warming to evolution to Antarctica to space... it gore on and on. Certainly worth your time to explore.

     

    Optical Illusions  from the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences.  Very good introduction to optical illusions for kids.  Close to 50 of them with links to more! Part of a larger kid site.

     

    Science News for Kids is for ages 10 and up because of its writing. Very interesting and NOT dumbed-down sections on: Atoms and Forces, Earth and Sky, Humans and Health, Life, Tech and Math, and Extra. Factual articles cover subjects in depth (examples: electronic Skin, Cars of the Future, Caecilians - the other amphibian, Anesthesia MRIs, the Little Ice Age, Seabird Math, No Frostbite for Dogs, Life Beyond Earth. Plenty of graphics to grab interest.

     

    SEA This is the "sea" portion of Sea and Sky's site. This is a wonderful resource and study site - (with the exception of "Sea News" which we do not think is appropriate for your students.) However, the rest of this site is worth an extended stay by teachers and students. The Ocean Realm is the best single section, but Ocean Exploration, Links (big list), the photo gallery, and the games are all good. Someone did a lot of work to gather and organize all this information.

     

    Sheppard's Science Resources Science resources by subject, web quests, science links, calculator and converter, more.

     

    Surfing Scientist Classroom or homeschool science ideas. From the ABC (Australian Broadcasting Corporation).

     

    Waterford Games & Activities "Download hundreds of free games, activities, and quizzes from our website! Subject areas include animals, plants, weather, astronomy, geology, and miscellany... Simply copy materials to your desktop and print out as needed. It's that easy!"

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